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Waropen residents are still afraid of conducting HIV test

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Campaign poster to encourage people having VCT test – IST

Jayapura, Jubi – Waren Puskesmas Manager, Waropen district, Papua province, stated that people in the area are still afraid to check HIV at VCT clinics in puskesmas (neighborhood health centre), although socialization on HIV transmission and prevention is routinely carried out. They worry about being ostracized by families and communities if the results test turn out positive.

“Actually there is awareness of Waropen residents to come to the VCT clinic, but when they want to check of their HIV status they become reluctant,” said Tiasito Windagdu, VCT Clinical Laboratory Coordinator of Waren Health Center, when confirmed from Jayapura on Monday (October 30).

He said the reluctance of HIV-related self-examination was motivated by the assumption of getting negative stigma from the family.

“Stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Waropen is still high, they are afraid not to have HIV and then be alienated by their families,” he said.

In fact, even if they are HIV positive, still many people would think that the disease suffered due to ‘spirits disturbance’ or Waropen residents call it Suanggi.

“If the result of the examination at the clinic is HIV shows positive, some would hesitate to seek treatment because of the ‘suanggi’ belief” said Tiasito.

He also added that VCT clinic at Puskesmas Waren actively socialize the ways of prevention of HIV transmission despite the limited funds. (tabloidjubi.com/Zely)

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A sad story of education from Papuan outreached and border areas

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Pupils at schools in outreached Papua. – Jubi/Dok

Jayapura, Jubi – Education, in Papua today is still a sad story since many schools in outreached or border areas have to struggle to continue their activities even without adequate support from the government.

An educational activist Agustinus Kadepa said the education in Papua, especially in the border and outreached areas, is a complex issue, from the lack of teachers’ attendance to lack of teaching facilities that hampers the learning activities at school.

“This is complicated. Furthermore, we know that a good and qualified educational education could exist when it gains support from many aspects, namely the economy, educational facilities, public awareness of education and so on. Therefore, I think these factors have made many teachers prefer to live in town rather than in those remote areas,” said Kadepa on Thursday (24/1/2019).

Another factor is when teachers apply for the position of civil servants. It has an indirect impact on the number of teachers staying at schools, especially in remote areas. Because most of those teachers would accept the new position as a civil servant and choose to live in town rather than continue teaching in remote areas.

Meanwhile, this problem also considered by the village chief of Kampung Moso, Muara Tami Sub-district of Jayapura Municipality, Agus Watapoa. He said that all the time the primary schools of the Indonesian and PNG border have not a sufficient number of teachers. Therefore, the children are neglected and cannot study at school.

“Teachers who teach in this school village come late to school, at 10 in the morning. So this school is not well running. It’s still open but just not running very well because we only have two classes with a roof,” he said. (*)

Reporter: Agus Pabika

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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The story of Nduga refugees: Mother died while giving birth to her child

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Refugees in Nduga – Jubi/Doc

Nduga, Jubi – On Wednesday (9/1/2019), the sixteen-years-old Inambo Tabuni just arrived in Wamena, and she told her story in a refugee camp. 

Soldiers came by helicopter; a bomb dropped into the village.

People fled to the forest to save their lives. Many parents were separated with their children, while those who’re in refugee camp feel grateful that they can run away,” she recounted the incident occurred in the mid-December 2018.

The refugees take shelter in provisional tents and caves in the forest. They have insufficient food to eat. Men took a risk walking dozens of kilometres to reach gardens. They gathered sweet potatoes and taros from the garden in the night.

It helped us to stand for two or three days. After that, men will return to the garden and come back in the night,” she said.

According to her refugees are distributed into small groups to a big group. “Each group contains at least ten people or more.”

She also revealed their suffering living in a refugee camp. “It seems that we are living in someone else’s place. We want to live safely in our village.”

When she arrived in Mbua from Dal, a pregnant woman Selfina Lokbere (32 years old) just came from a refugee camp, and last week Lokbere reportedly had a delivery complication. Both mother and child died.

Selfina Lokbere, who was the wife of Yakerena Umangge, reportedly gave birth to twins. Her first twin managed to be smoothly born, while the second got stuck during delivery.

The second child did not come out, so the mother tried to pull her baby out, but she couldn’t make it.”

Meanwhile, Elinaus Tabuni, a member of the health care team of Papua Province in Mbua Sub-district, Nduga Regency, confirmed the incident that occurred on 2 January 2019.  

This woman just arrived from the forest and gave birth. She had only a child who died with her during the delivery,” he said.

Further, the congregation of Imanuel Church of Mbua takes care of the funeral of Selfina Lokbere and her child, while the medical team checked the rest of her family. It turns out that she has other six children who are still alive. They are Esok Umangge (7), Londice Umangge (8), Ason Umangge (9), Jemison Umangge (3), and the twins Rinthi dan Rentha (2,6). Currently, the twins of the late Selfina Lokbere, Rinthi and Rentha then raised by Gelipa Tabuni, their mother’s relative.

In the meantime, locals said the cause of her death is because she didn’t eat and drink well while in the refugee camp, whereas the medical team thought it’s possibly because of her giving birth too often.

Meanwhile, related to Nduga refugees, the Secretary of Youth Church Solidarity Alfonsa Wayap said three children were reported dead in refugee camp due to malnutrition. The children Ubugina Unue (2), Bugun Unue (1) and Raina Kogoya (5) died in Yal Sub-district.

The local also said there are ten pregnant women among them. “Some already give births while some are waiting for the due date.” (*)

 

Reporter: Benny Mawel

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Budget regulation causes delay on Papuan scholarship scheme

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Photo of George Mason University courtesy of university. – doc / patch.com

Jayapura, Jubi – Anthony Mirin, the Head of Papua Human Resources Development Department of Special Autonomy Bureau of Papua Provincial Secretariat, finally responded to the rumours of deportation of several Papuan students from the United States.

“I already made sure no one deported. There are those who deliberately take advantage of this issue. The world ‘deportation’ is exaggerating,” said Mirin in a release on Saturday (5/1/2019).

Earlier seven Papuan students studying at George Mason University in Virginia, USA reportedly would be deported due to the late payment of their tuition fee of 2019 by the provincial government of Papua. It also said that the government still not pay some allowances including the housing cost for 2019, health insurance funds for 2018 and 2019 and living cost from October to December 2018.

Regarding the financial allowances, Mirin said the government already transferred the latest living cost allowance for the students in 2018. “Meanwhile, the living cost allowance from January to April 2019 will process on Monday due to the public holidays. People return to the office after Christmas and New Year break,” he said.

He also suggested the students to not worry about the tuition fees because the provincial government has managed it. To avoid misunderstanding, he encouraged the students who have not received clear information about this to further communicate with the bureau.

However, he said he much appreciated all feedbacks, but asked people to take away their negative thoughts and work together to improve Papua and Indonesia.

“Since 2017, we started with new management by building and improving the scholarships management system as well as the distribution of living cost or stipend for students. We then decided not to involve the third parties or agents or consultants as before. We removed that part by issuing an official letter. Soon the Special Autonomy Bureau tackled this program directly so that we can identify many problems faced by the students who are studying in country or abroad,” he explained.

Currently, the Special Autonomy Bureau has developed a student database system and improved the payment system to ensure the distribution of payment run correctly. However, he said their current problem is the budget regulation which not allowed them to use the budget from the end year, while the budget for the beginning year is not available yet.

As a solution, Mirin said he had conveyed this issue to the governor so that they can discuss it and establish a Special Governor Regulation on the budget for the end and beginning of the year to finance the overseas student fees.

“Because without a clear regulation, this incident will keep happening from time to time, no matter who the governor or the bureau head is,” he said.

Previously, a Facebook account posted a letter to the Chairman of Papua Parliament Yunus Wonda sent by a parent of Papuan students studying in the United States. In his letter, the parent stated that until the second week of January 2019, the provincial government of Papua did not fulfil their obligation to seven Papuan students, namely Yvette Helene Papare, Lucia Deda, Kezia Nunaki, Ade Olua, Evelien Hamadi, Julio Kbarek, and Prishella Pandori. They are reported to be deported by the United States government.

“Currently they (the students) are very anxious about their situation and plan to fly to Washington D.C. to find the Indonesian Embassy to submit their complaints and try to figure out the solution,” said the parent Yves Pierre Papare. (*)

 

Reporter: Yance Wenda

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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